betabug... Sascha Welter

home english | home deutsch | Site Map | Sascha | Kontakt | Pro | Weblog | Wiki

30 July 2017

UT-FD120 - 12.45 Euro for two pieces of plastic and good shifting gears

My personal review of the Campagnolo UT-FD120 Front Derailleur Alignment Tool

For quite some time me and my mechanic have been fighting to get the front derailleur on my Campagnolo Veloce triple to shift well. Actually, even when I got the bike from the shop in Athens, it wasn't shifting so well either. It would go into the small ring only with some good talking to, only when you were in certain rear cogs. Adjust it and it wouldn't like to go into the big ring now, or then in the middle ring you had to "correct" all the time. Then the chain jammed a couple of times and things got even worse.

As I know now, the root cause of all this was that the front derailleur wasn't aligned properly parallel to the chain ring. Now of course if you are an experienced Campagnolo mechanic who adjusts 10 of these things every day, you don't have any problems to get the thing aligned parallel. (But then I wonder why the shop in Athens didn't get it right the first time...) Or you grew up in a time when front derailleurs were simple affairs of two straight, parallel pieces of metal, you can see the alignment and not my point. Nowadays front derailleurs have strange bends and curves to improve shifting - and I have squinted my eyes out to get to see where they are parallel.

In comes the "Campagnolo UT-FD120 Front Derailleur Alignment Tool", which I ordered - 12.45 Euro that I gambled on - suspecting that it would not change much. But it did! The instructions / manuals on Campagnolo's site don't mention the use of this tool for the triple. We had to improvise a bit, and I can see where things are easier for a double. Still, in a very short time we got the shifting to become perfect. We also installed a chain catcher for extra peace of mind.

My shifting is now optimized for rides with lots of climbs and changing gradients here on Naxos. I can use all the bigger cogs on the cassette while I'm in the middle ring, without having to adjust the front shift - and if that isn't enough, I can drop into the small chain ring. (Without fear of dropping the chain, thanks to better adjustment and the chain catcher.)

There are two of those plastic pieces sold together in the set. One is for when your big chainring is a 52 or 53 tooth, the other if it's a 50 tooth. They do not only help to get the front derailleur aligned parallel, they give you the perfect "height" or distance from the chainring too, making shifting even more smooth.

So in short: Buying those two little tools was totally worth it. You pay for the ease of proper shifting, not for the moulded plastic.


Posted by betabug at 19:12 | Comments (0) | Trackbacks (0)
ch athens
Life in Athens (Greece) for a foreigner from the other side of the mountains. And with an interest in digital life and the feeling of change in a big city. Multilingual English - German - Greek.
Main blog page
Recent Entries
Best of
Some of the most sought after posts, judging from access logs and search engine queries.

Apple & Macintosh:
Security & Privacy:
Misc technical:
Athens for tourists and visitors:
Life in general:
<< Bike Checklist | Main |
Comments
There are no comments.
Trackbacks
You can trackback to: http://betabug.ch/blogs/ch-athens/1447/tbping
There are no trackbacks.
Leave a comment